PBS NewsHour Explores the Plight of Adjuncts

Since graduating in 2012, Nicole Beth Wallenbrock has worked part-time and is now teaching just two courses at the City University of New York, making $2,800 a class, though she’s more highly-rated than almost all of her peers.

She’s moved to the cheapest place she could find on the outskirts of the city, a three-hour-a-day commute. But she can’t make it without public assistance and help from her family. "I’m a precarious worker. I have no job security. So I have to accept whatever I can get. It’s depressing. It makes me feel like a failure in a lot of ways."

Students and faculty across the country are now rallying for higher adjunct pay and the right to unionize.

 

 

Since graduating in 2012, Nicole Beth Wallenbrock has worked part-time and is now teaching just two courses at the City University of New York, making $2,800 a class, though she’s more highly-rated than almost all of her peers.

She’s moved to the cheapest place she could find on the outskirts of the city, a three-hour-a-day commute. But she can’t make it without public assistance and help from her family. "I’m a precarious worker. I have no job security. So I have to accept whatever I can get. It’s depressing. It makes me feel like a failure in a lot of ways."

Students and faculty across the country are now rallying for higher adjunct pay and the right to unionize.